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Occupational Health & Safety

British Columbia government bans mandatory high heels in the workplace

Jurisdiction: - British Columbia

The British Columbia government announced today that it is following through on its commitment to ban mandatory high heels in the workplace.

This moves follows the introduction of a bill to the same effect by British Columbia Green Party Leader and MLA Andrew Weaver on March 7, 2017,  International Women's Day.

The full text of the news release is as follows:

B.C. bans mandatory high heels in the workplace

The B.C. government has followed through on its commitment to ban mandatory high heels in the workplace, announced Minister of Jobs, Tourism and Skills Training and Minister Responsible for Labour, Shirley Bond.

The requirement to wear high heels in some workplaces is a workplace health and safety issue. There is a risk of physical injury from slipping or falling, as well as possible damage to the feet, legs and back from prolonged wearing of high heels while at work.  read more »

Top 10 most significant employment law cases in Canada for women

In light of International Women's Day back on March 8, 2015, Legal Feeds, the Blog for Canadian Lawyer & Law Times published a list of the most significant court decisions for women in the workplace over the last 25 year, as compiled by the lawyers at Rubin Thomlinson LLP in Ontario. Here is the firm's top 10 list:  read more »

NDP's "Intern Protection Act" debated for first time in Parliament

The federal New Democrat Party (NDP) issued the following press release on February 17, 2015 concerning the Intern Protection Act, which is a private member's bill tabled by NDP MP, Laurin Liu:

NDP will protect interns
 read more »

Amendments to Canada Labour Code narrow employees' right to refuse work on basis it is unsafe

Jurisdiction: - Canada/Federal

Amendments to the Canada Labour Code - Part II that came into effect on October 28, 2014 are intended to narrow an employee's right to refuse work on basis it is not safe ((under sec. 128 of the Code).

For more information on these amendments, see  read more »

Exec not acting in employment-related capacity when he massaged employee's neck; civil claim can proceed

Jurisdiction: - Ontario

In Decision No. 727/13, 2014 ONWSIAT 1128, the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board Appeals Tribunal ("WSIB) ruled that an executive was not acting in an employment-related capacity when he massaged an employee's neck. As such, the employee's right to sue the executive was not removed by the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Act and her civil claim against the executive could proceed.

The case summary provides a follows:

The plaintiff brought an action against her employer and an executive officer of the employer. The defendants applied to determine whether the plaintiff's right of action was taken away.  read more »