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Duty to Accommodate

Employee's pornography viewing at work not linked to recognized disability; dismissal upheld by arbitrator

Jurisdiction: - British Columbia
Sector: - Health Care

Interior Health Authority (South Similkameen Health Centre) and Hospital Employees' Union, (R.P. Discharge) [2013] B.C.C.A.A.A. No. 44 (Kate Young)

Ontario court confirms that employee with "anger management issues" not disabled under Code

Jurisdiction: - Ontario
Sector: - Public Safety

In Gulick v. Ottawa Police Service, 2012 ONSC 5536, the Ontario Superior court confirmed that an employee with "anger management issues" was not disabled for the purposes of the Ontario Human Rights Code and thus not entitled to accommodation.

Specifically, the court stated the following in this case, which involved the dismissal of a police officer:

[15] While the incident giving rise to the disciplinary hearing did involve
some consumption of alcohol and medications, the Hearing Officer found as a
fact that the incident was triggered by anger management issues with which the
applicant had been struggling for several years.  The Hearing Officer found
that alcohol was, at most, an exacerbating factor.  We are not aware of any
jurisprudence which has established that anger management issues will support a
finding of disability.  read more »

"Accommodating Employees Who Have Made LTD Claims"

"Accommodating Employees Who Have Made LTD Claims" (undated) is the title of a paper written by Lauren M. Bernardi, at Bernardi Human Resources Law.

No free-standing duty to treat employee “fairly and with due respect for dignity" during accommodation process

Jurisdiction: - British Columbia
Sector: - Health Care

In Emergency Health Services Commission v. Cassidy, 2011 BCSC 100, the BC Supreme Court ruled that there was no free-standing procedural obligation on an employer to treat an employee “fairly, and with due respect for his dignity" during the duty to accommodate process, the failure of which could ground an award of damages.

The BC Human Rights Tribunal had previously ruled in this case that while accommodating the employee's physical disability would have represented an undue hardship to the employer, the employer was still liable for damages to the employee for failing to treat him fairly and with due respect for his dignity during the duty to accommodate process.

The damages awarded by the Tribunal included an award of $22,500 for injury to dignity, feelings and self-respect. 

The Tribunal's decisions can be found here:  read more »